NOT KIDDING
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Thu, 05/16/2019 - 11:04

Topic

The Ways We Win

Students rising up to demand a liveable future

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Students take the lead to combat climate change. In early January 2019, in response to the political climate, students in Montreal aged 15 to 22 started organizing as La planète s’invite à l’Université (LPSU) and Pour le Futur (high school). In just three months, the collectives organized tens of thousands of students across Quebec to participate in the Global Student Strike for Climate Action on March 15.

BY PEYTON MITCHELL
Peyton is a university student and climate justice activist in Montreal.

In early January 2019, in response to the political climate, students in Montreal aged 15 to 22 started organizing as La planète s’invite à l’Université (LPSU) and Pour le Futur (high school). In just three months, the collectives organized tens of thousands of students across Quebec to participate in the Global Student Strike for Climate Action on March 15.

The Montreal march brought 150,000 supporters onto the streets to demand climate justice from our governments, the largest in the world on that day by far. Immediately afterward, students were holding meetings to discuss next steps, and how to leverage the attention from the march to make an impact on the coming  federal election.

In the weeks after the March 15 protest, student activists met with Quebec Minister of Environment Benoit Charette, who wasted their time during midterms by speaking at them and not to them, about the climate crisis and some of their demands were presented to the National Assembly of Quebec by Quebec Solidaire leader Manon Masse.

While some members continued to work within the Quebec political landscape others began to reach out to youth across Canada. Students from Vancouver, London, Kingston, Ottawa, Stratford, Montreal and Toronto began to organize remotely via the online workspace, Slack as “Climate Strike Canada”. Their goal is to create a national network of student climate activists to ensure Canadian youth can present a united voice on what we expect from federal climate platforms in this election.

Seven climate justice essentials

In April in the midst of term papers and finals, the student network made crowd-sourced climate justice demands through an open google doc. Students from all over Canada wrote in what they expected from their governments...

OPINION
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Mon, 04/29/2019 - 18:25

Topic

How Fair is That

HERE'S WHAT'S WRONG
WITH DOUG FORD'S ONTARIO

Q

The word alcohol or beer appears 46 times in the Doug Ford budget. Coincidence?

CHAPTER 6:

THERE'S A REASON
WHY WE CONTROL ALCOHOL

THE WORD ALCOHOL OR BEER appears 46 times in the Doug Ford budget. From corner stores to tailgating to opening the taps at 9 in the morning, this government is fixated on alcohol, like an alcoholic. Obsessed. Who needs a drink at 9 in the morning? An alcoholic.

But there’s a reason we control alcohol. Alcohol is a dangerous substance. A drug.

Health Canada estimates that 4 to 5 million Canadians engage in high risk drinking, which is linked to motor vehicle accidents, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and other health issues, family problems, crime and violence.

Depending on how much you drink, alcohol can be linked to both chronic and acute alcohol-related harms. Chronic alcohol-related harms include cancer, liver cirrhosis and other diseases and illnesses. Acute alcohol-related harms include alcohol poisoning, fights and accidents.

This isn’t about freedom or personal choice. Doug Ford just made a dangerous substance more available and more open to abuse. We think he might have a problem. Maybe rehab would help.

Stand Up. Fight Back. Don’t Give Up.

C

 

 

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Canadians for a Modern Industrial Strategy

TEST
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Mon, 04/29/2019 - 17:46

Topic

How Fair is That

Q

THERE WAS SOMETHING DARK ABOUT IT ALL. Dark enough so that the mass evictions of more than 500 Heron Gate residents last year prompted a human rights complaint against the City of Ottawa and the landlord behind the largest mass eviction in Canadian history.

 

EAST TARGETS
Mass evictions are human rights violations say tenants
Margeret Allukar, Heron Gate tenant activist

THERE WAS SOMETHING DARK ABOUT IT ALL. Dark enough so that the mass evictions of more than 500 Heron Gate residents last year prompted a human rights complaint against the City of Ottawa and the landlord behind the largest mass eviction in Canadian history.

The claim before the Human Rights Tribunal accuses Timbercreek Asset Management of racial discrimination, and the City of Ottawa of being complicit in the evictions.

According to the claim, 90 per cent of the evicted tenants of the community were immigrants or people of colour. It says their forced displacement destroyed a vibrant community that was welcoming to new Canadians.

Timbercreek tried to explain away the evictions by claiming the 150 townhouses had deteriorated beyond repair.

The demolished homes are now piles of rubble behind blue construction fencing.

‘Discriminatory’ vision

The human rights complaint alleges Timbercreek displaced a large group of low-income immigrant families with the aim of building new apartments to attract a “predominantly affluent, adult-oriented, white and non-immigrant community in its stead.”

As for the City of Ottawa’s role, the filing states the bylaw department neglected to hold Timbercreek accountable when they constantly failed to meet municipal housing bylaws.

Consider the reception one tenant got when he made a complaint about a flooded basement. A by-law inspector came around, but nothing was done—because Timbercreek successfully appealed the inspector’s work order to the city’s secretive Property Standards and License Appeals Committee. The tenant wasn’t even notified of the hearing.

The complaint says the net effect of such collusion with Timbercreek means the city failed in its obligations under international human rights law and the provincial human rights code, to ensure that development does not displace members of marginalized groups.

A tangled tale

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