Even those who claim to oppose industrial policies implementing them

A new report from the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP) shows that even governments that claim to oppose industrial policies are implementing them.

In The Resurgence of Industrial Policy and What It Means for Canada the authors suggest that the success of countries that are openly pursuing industrial policies and the role industrial policies have played in the past in all developed countries mean more countries will be adopting industrial policies.

Linking research funding to commercial innovation likely to backfire

Canadian scientist and environmentalist, David Suzuki, points out that, as scientific research often produces unexpected results, it can be hard to predict what projects will end up having the greatest commercial application. He cites two examples of research that had considerable impact, but would never have received funding under new rules.

Carbon bubble could have same impact as 2008 financial crisis

Two recent reports are warning that the over-valuation of oil, gas and coal reserves could lead to a  “carbon bubble” that would have the same type of impact on the economy as the 2008 financial crisis.

Use of Temporary Foreign Worker Program only small part of problem at RBC

Ironically, the use of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program for one of the people being trained to replace Canadians employed by RBC is just the tip of the iceberg.

The impending layoffs of technology workers at RBC show how easily Canadian companies can outsource jobs to other countries and how widespread it has become. It has also made it clear how, instead of discouraging companies from moving jobs out of Canada, government policies make it easier.

Improving innovation performance requires active participation of government and public institutions

In a recent opinion piece, Dr. Feridun Hamdullahpur, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Waterloo, suggested three measures to improve innovation in Canada. All require involvement of government or public institutions.

Gagging scientists hampers research and development

Federal government restrictions on Canadian government scientists speaking publicly about their work have been criticized for the impact on accountability and democratic decision making, but the restrictions also have the potential to harm Canadian research and development.

Keystone XL set to create jobs in Texas

Among the complaints about the Keystone XL pipeline is that it will further limit Canada to being an exporter of low value raw materials for others to make money processing. A Globe and Mail article on the impact Keystone is expected to have on oil refineries near Houston provided yet another reminder of how refining Canadian oil will help the US economy.

Fraser Institute praise of Norway's management of oil revenues misses key points

The Fraser Institute is right to praise Norway's management of it's oil revenues.

Even though Norway's petroleum fund was created 20 years after the Alberta Heritage Savings Fund, it is 41 times the size. It has $664 billion in assets and is growing rapidly. In contrast, the Alberta Heritage Savings Fund has only $16 billion.

Trade deal supporter now questions whether they work for Canada

A corporate lawyer specializing in international trade and affiliated with the C.D. Howe Institute questioning the value of the trade deals Canada has been signing with other countries seems unlikely. But it's happened.

Lack of energy strategy bad for economy as well as environment

A recent article in the Winnipeg Free Press argued that the failure to look at the environmental impact of energy projects isn't just bad for the environment. It's harming the economy.

The federal government would do a better job of meeting our energy and economic needs with a national strategy that addresses environmental impacts from the beginning.

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